Shoutout to my mom

I want to give a little shoutout to my mama.  We’ve had our differences over the years, like any mother and daughter, but I can honestly say she’s one of the most thoughtful people I know. And woefully under-celebrated for it. One small example: if you mention you like something, even in passing, she’ll put it in her memory bank for later.  She’ll notice what chocolate you eat when you’re home and mail it halfway around the world, wrapped, for Christmas.  My mother has never forgotten a birthday or an anniversary or overlooked an important date. (The woman’s got a memory of an elephant. Unless you’ve wronged her—in that case she lets it go). She sends more cards for these events than anyone I know: even to people she doesn’t know that well or who have abused her and my father’s kindness. 

With her church group, Peg hand-knits shawls for people who are sick or grieving. My grandmother used  to call her the power behind the throne, (my father being the king) and she wasn’t kidding.  I think even Dad  would agree (to a point) that that’s a fairly accurate statement, or at least not inaccurate.  Hers is a quiet power. 

Probably no one would accuse her of being touchy feeling or lovey dovey. My first boyfriend still jokes about how, after years of us dating, she still signed her cards to him, ‘Fondly, Peg.’ As mentioned, her caring nature is more quiet; backed up by actions instead of little nicknames or endearing monikers, for which she has little patience. (I may have gotten that from her.) 

My mother is extremely humble and probably would never want me to post her picture here, but I just wanted to show my appreciation, because unfortunately it’s rare that I do. Love you Mom! Thank you for all you do, for me and so many others.

A Few Ways to Instantly Raise Your Vibe

Feeling down?  Here are some ways to instantly raise your vibe.  If it’s more than just a blah moment, you may just have to feel it to heal it.  Give yourself time, and then when you’re ready, try one of these instant mood boosters.  Or do something that lights YOU up, whatever that may be.

A short true story

When my grandparents were younger, they didn’t have a lot of money and so my gram worked a lot of different jobs while my grandfather was working his main job. They were busy so didn’t see that much of each other. But every night after dinner, they’d stand side-by-side at the sink and wash the dishes together. She’d wash and he’d dry, and sometimes they’d alternate. Later when these crazy, newfangled machines called ‘dishwashers’ were becoming more common, she proudly announced that she was going to buy the family a new one. This would be a big expense, but she somehow always managed to get by, invoking the phrase, ‘the lord shall provide.’ She was the matriarch of the house. there was no need for a patriarch. My grandfather didn’t have much say in that household. My grandmother used to tell me she always got her way (and I witnessed it often myself) but only because my grandfather was so kind and gentle.

But this time he shocked her—he overrode the idea, saying that their after-dinner cleaning time was special to him, and they would NOT be getting a dishwasher thank you very much. She had no idea until that moment how much it had meant to him.

Their household remained dishwasher-free for the next 20 years, when they moved into a house that, for good or bad, already had one. ❤️

10 great and 10 sh*tty things about middle age

Just when you start getting in the flow and think you’ve got this ‘life’ stuff figured out, things start becoming a shit show.  

You fall apart physically

  1. Your eyelashes disappear / get thinner, aging you by at least ten years
  2. Grey hairs come in in droves
  3. Menopause looms
  4. You creak and crack whenever you move (or pull a muscle putting on a sock)
  5. Two words: muffin top
  6. Wrinkles…deep lines…puffy eyes. All the stuff that makes you scared to look in the mirror every morning.

Then there’s life circumstances:

  1. Aging parents. Family members start dying /getting dementia/ cancer etc.
  2. Empty nest syndrome
  3. Having babies is a young woman’s game. For older women it’s exhausting— plus you have to deal with all the rest of the bullet points.
  4. Harder to change careers or get a new job

No wonder the midlife crisis is a thing. BUT! There’s hope.  Some of the good points are truly priceless, so they balance out the bad.

  1. Hard-earned knowledge. For what you lose in beauty/youth, you make up for in wisdom. (Seriously! Would you *really* want to be 22 again?)
  2. Mo’ money
  3. You’re more confident / secure in who you truly are
  4. It’s much easier to not care about what others think of you (true freedom!)
  5. Day drinking is cool
  6. You’re usually higher up in your career / have lots of expertise
  7. The chance to be a hot cougar!
  8. Empty nesters can travel more and not have to sleep in a hostel or one-star hotel
  9. Wisdom. Ok it’s the same as knowledge but it’s essential. Imagine making the same mistakes you did in your teens or 20s!
  10. You get really clear on your life’s priorities and what’s most important to you. Times a’ wasting, people. You ain’t getting any younger; the time to do reach your goals is now!

What would you add to these lists?

Do you agree that the good outweighs or at least balances out the bad?